The Troutman Flag

The Troutman Flag

In 1835 the Texan's fight for independence attracted attention throughout the United States. Public meetings were held in many towns and representatives of the new Texas government were welcomed in cities from New Orleans to New York. Stephen F. Austin delivered an outstanding speech in Louisville, Kentucky, that attracted a great deal of support for the cause of Texan independence. Although the official policy of the United States was one of neutrality, hundreds of individuals headed west to respond to the call for help and to seek their fortune in Texas. In addition, organized groups of volunteers were sent from communities in Kentucky, Ohio, Georgia, Louisiana and Alabama.

For one such group from Macon, Georgia, this flag was made by an 18 year old girl, Joanna Troutman. When the Georgians arrived at Velasco on the Texas coast the flag was raised. It was one of the most inspirational symbols in the dark months between the defeat at the Alamo and the victory at San Jacinto. After the Georgia battalion reported at San Felipe, Colonel William A. Ward, in command of the Georgians, led his men to the aid of Colonel Fannin at Goliad. This flag was saluted again on March 8th, 1836, when Fannin's men received word of the official declaration of independence of Texas. In the weeks that followed, virtually the entire Georgia command, the "Red Rovers" of Alabama and the Texans including Fannin, a total of almost 390 men, were taken prisoner and massacred at Goliad after they lost the battles of Refugio and Coleto.